དེ་རིང་མཉམ་འབྲེལ་རྒྱལ་ཚོགས་ཀྱིས་འགྲོ་བ་མིའི་ཐོབ་ཐང་ཡོངས་ཁྱབ་གསལ་བསྒྲགས་བྱས་ཏེ་མི་ལོ་༧༤ འཁོར་བའི་དུས་ཆེན་འཁེལ་ཞིང་འཛམ་གླིང་ཡོངས་སུ་འགྲོ་བ་མིའི་ཐོབ་ཐང་ཉིན་མོ་སྲུང་བརྩི་ཞུ་བཞིན་ཡོད། འདི་ལོའི་བརྗོད་དོན་གཙོ་བོ་ནི་‘མི་ཐམས་ཅད་ལ་ཆེ་མཐོང་དང་། རང་དབང་། དྲང་གཞག་’དགོས་པ་དེ་ཡིན། ང་ཚོས་དེ་རིང་འགྲོ་བ་མིའི་ཐོབ་ཐང་སྲུང་བརྩི་ཞུ་བཞིན་པའི་སྐབས་འདིར་བོད་ནང་གི་བོད་མི་ཚོ་གཙོས་པའི་མི་མང་ས་ཡ་མང་པོས་ད་དུང་རྒྱ་ནག་གི་རིམས་ནད་གཙང་དག་ཟེར་བའི་གདུག་རྩུབ་ཆེ་བའི་སྲིད་ཇུས་དེ་འོག་ཏུ་དཀའ་སྡུག་ཚད་མེད་མྱངས་དང་མྱོང་མུས་ཡིན་པས་རྒྱ་ནག་གཞུང་གིས་ནོར་འཁྲུལ་ཅན་གྱི་རིམས་ནད་གཙང་དག་གི་སྲིད་ཇུས་ཟེར་བ་མཚམས་འཇོག་བྱས་ཏེ་འགྲོ་བ་མིའི་ཐོབ་ཐང་ལ་བརྩི་བཀུར་དགོས་པའི་འབོད་སྐུལ་ནན་པོ་ཞུ་རྒྱུ་ཡིན།

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A Tibetan mother of two, who was also a popular social media personality, died at the hands of her ex-husband on 30 September because she had refused to return to her abusive marriage. Lhamo, 30, was stabbed and then set on fire by the ex-husband on 14 September while she was live streaming from her home. The horrifying attack on Lhamo on the Chinese video app Douyin triggered a wave of outrage among Chinese netizens, who condemned the crime and demanded that Chinese authorities be held accountable for failing to prevent domestic violence. Despite government censorship, there were vociferous calls advocating for better laws and support systems for domestic abuse victims. Lhamo’s tragic death highlighted China’s appalling tolerance of gender-based violence despite enacting the Anti-Domestic Law in 2016.

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On the 25th anniversary of the enforced disappearance of the 11th Panchen Lama Gedhun Choekyi Nyima, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) reiterates its call for his immediate and unconditional release and unfettered access to independent international human rights group to ascertain his fate and wellbeing.

Gedhun Choekyi Nyima was six years old when he and his parents became victims of enforced disappearance at the hands of Chinese authorities on 17 May 1995, three days after His Holiness the Dalai Lama had recognised him as the reincarnation of the previous 10th Panchen Lama.

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The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) launched today the #WhyProtest digital campaign to promote and protect the right to freedom of peaceful assembly or the right to protest. The right to protest is universally recognised as a fundamental human right that is crucial to creating a tolerant and pluralistic society in which groups with different beliefs, practices, or policies can coexist peacefully. This fundamental right is necessary for the exercise of other human rights.

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The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) is pleased to announce that the campaign against Gender-Based Violence (GBV) has been overwhelmingly successful. The opening ceremony on 25 November was well attended by the exile Tibetan community in India and others, and everyone was eager to listen and participate. Our guest speakers discussed statistics and stories that were poignant and informative with a highly engaged audience. Our digital campaign, continuing until 10 December, has been an even greater success. The videos of GBV survivors sharing their personal stories went viral with almost 30,000 public engagements with our posts in less than one week.

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